Innovate

R&D tax reliefs and grants work … will Patent Box work better?

Innovation is one of the best drivers of growth for an owner managed business… and luckily the Government really does get it… offering some bonkersly brilliant and accessible help that actually works for companies like yours…

As a form of Corporate Welfare (which I’m generally against) these innovation-orientated tax breaks and grants rather surprisingly do what they’re supposed to do… boost productivity and create jobs (which I absolutely love)

Innovate UK are busy getting grant money out to innovative firms… and, as the Enterprise Research Centre recently reported, the range of grants available has made a real impact… Over a 13-year period, R&D grants spurred growth worth £43bn to the British economy – more than five times the £8bn invested – and created around 150,000 jobs

… one helluva an ROI

But R&D Tax Reliefs  are doing even better imo… not only does research suggest this tax saving for SMEs is working financially…  Our current evaluation suggests that for each £1 of tax foregone, between £1.53 and £2.35 of R&D expenditure is stimulated… I believe it is changing the mindset of some of the companies applying…  

What started out as an attempt to justify a claim for a extra tax deductions and get money back from HMRC… is morphing into a mindset shift for the companies involved as they start to genuinely put innovation at the heart of what they do…

And I think the Patent Box could take that shift towards innovation to a completely different level…

The tax relief for having a Patent is now so good that companies I tell about it immediately start to think what they are doing or can do that’ll lead to a narrow patent and get them a 10% Corporation Tax rate for a couple of decades…

Changing minds is surely one of the hardest things for a Government to do… but, because of these innovative tax reliefs, minds really are changing when it comes to innovation

Here’s a couple of older blog posts on the subject…

R&D Relief

First Claim

Patent Box

And a great (if slightly technical) site for keeping up to date with any odd updates to the tax reliefs…

Keeping tabs on changes to reliefs

 

 

 

Dividends instead of Salary

Dividends instead of Salary… don’t do it !

There’s only one reason to pay yourself Dividends instead of Salary… to avoid a bit of tax / NI… but here’s 5 reasons not to…

Dividends are not ‘relevant earnings’ for pension purposes.. so payments into your pension can’t be deducted from any Dividend income… but they can be from any Salary

Salary makes your affairs simpler, clearer… with tax paid as you go along… minimising lumpy shocks & payments of extra tax in January & July

Funders don’t really get you paying out their money as Dividends… try telling some of them you’re paying yourselves that way to avoid paying some tax & see how they like it… particularly if you’re trying to raise new money… (I know a Bank Manager who absolutely hates it)… and if you’re looking to work with Venture Capitalists & Angels they’ll often put constraints on the company paying out Dividends

R&D tax reliefs are now so generous that companies will often forego a Grant to keep the tax relief… a Salary for someone working on R&D (that’ll be you too as the company Owner Manager) attracts a lot of relief… Dividends don’t count

Overdoing the Dividends can turn ‘Profits to Losses’… not strictly so… but taking out too many Dividends in any one year can shrink your Balance Sheet… making it look like your company made a loss… when it may have made a Profit… which’ll hurt your Credit Ratings

So… as the tax regime around Dividends gets tightened up… and the smell around some forms of avoidance gets stronger… maybe it’s time to have a word with your accountant… and make sure your Dividend payment policy still suits you…?

 

Source Documents & Calculators

New Dividend Tax Regime

Cracking Tax Calculators to play with

Simple explanation of Pension & Divs for tax year April 2017 and how the company can make tax deductible contributions to your pension… even if your low Salary means you can’t

The picture with this post comes from Salary Versus Dividends & Other Tax Efficient Profit Extraction Strategies: Written by Nick Braun

Capital Allowances

Capital Allowances… have you any waiting to be claimed?

If you’ve spent money on assets you have the right to Capital Allowances… which help reduce your tax bill… but are you claiming all that you can?

Sometimes keeping up with all the rules & wrinkles can be a tad too much for smaller accountancy practices… particularly the rules related to property…

e.g. did you know you can claim capital allowances for fixtures & features on buy to let properties?… without invoices for the work done?

There are specialist tax firms who’ll take a look at an Owner Managed Businesses assets to figure out :

1. if there are claims to be made… and

2. if claims are being made are they being maximised

And they bill on a no-gain-no-pain basis… so what have you got to lose?

Here’s a firm who’ve had a lot of success maximising Capital Allowance claims… Leeds Based

The C3 Group .  and here’s a flier introducing you to Peffs

Permanently Embedded Fixtures & Features (PEFFs) may be claimed on most types of commercial property, from retail or industrial units to offices and factories, to bars, hotels and restaurants. They can also be claimed on more specialised commercial properties such as nursing homes, doctor or dentists surgeries, sport centres and even data storage centres. PEFFs can also be claimed on residential buy to let properties that are let to more than one unrelated persons such as student accommodation.

Why not check it out & claim all the Capital Allowances you can?

patent box

Patently obvious… open the box & take the money

The Patent Box means the tax rate on profits made from patents is to drop to just 10%…

This is a cracking way to encourage firms to patent their Intellectual Property (IP), and exploit it from here in the UK.

Any profits derived from exploiting a patent you own will be taxed in future at 10%… and not the current 20%

Patents can cost as little as a few grand to file… so should easily pay for themselves… because you get up to 20 years of paying tax at the reduced rate

So why not take a look at your IP… and take a look at Patenting some of it  ?
 I’ll admit that in the past I’ve been luke-warm on patents… the effort & costs just didn’t seem worth it for smaller Owner Managed Businesses given the limited commercial benefits.

The patent gives you protection… and that could boost your business’ value… and make new external funders a little more comfortable investing/dealing with you…but…

Read more

R&D Tax Credits… they want YOU to claim them

… and you don’t need a white coat… or an R&D department

Research & Development tax credits are the Government’s way of encouraging companies to develop new products and services…

Any company that spends money trying to improve a product or service or even a process through a technological advance where there’s doubt about the project’s success is likely to be eligible.

Is that you?

There’s a real good chance it is, and frankly HMRC are desperate for SMEs like you to claim the tax relief, regardless of the sector you operate in.


Some research suggests the largest number of claimants are in construction, and not high tech companies as you might expect.

I personally know of landscape gardners, web companies and very small manufacturers who have been successful in getting actual cash back from the tax man… and they did it all themselves.

How’s it work?

If you’ve spent money on R&D costs such as wages, raw materials & software then you can deduct up to 225% of these costs from your taxable profits. You can go back up to 3 years, and if that means you’ve overpaid tax then HMRC will send you a cheque.

And they send that cheque real quick.

Who does the claiming
Your accountant should be able to do it for you… but often they won’t, and frankly some don’t know how.

‘It’s not for companies in your sector’
‘It’ll mean masses more paperwork’
‘You have to produce a huge technical report.’
‘It will probably spark a tax investigation from HMRC’

Just some of the things accountants have told companies I know… so I told those companies to call HMRC directly and do it themselves… and they were all successful in getting the reliefs… without their accountant’s help… or fees.

A word on consultants & what will they cost?

There are some very good ‘no gain, no pain’ consultancy firms who will help you claim the tax relief. That means no payment unless they get you some tax money back.

Personally I know Terry Toms at RandDtax.co.uk… and they do a great job… taking 18% of the money recovered

There are others (eg Jumpstart ) and terms differ so it’s worth checking just what you’ll be paying out if successful (& for how long… I’ve heard of one that takes a cut for the next 4 years too… which is a touch too generous!)

Your first Claim

Have a poke around the HMRC website. See if you roughly match the basic criteria. Then give them a call. They really are very friendly and helpful … at least when it comes to R&D tax reliefs!

HMRC’s eligibility criteria can look daunting (there are links below)… but it’s not

Try asking yourself these questions :

Technology : Does my company attempt to develop new technology, with no guarantee of success?

Improvement : Does my company try to make objective, measurable, and significant improvements to the design and implementation of its products, services or processes?

Problem solving  : Does my company use appropriately qualified or experienced internal staff to solve a challenging technical problem (although you can use sub-contractor for parts of the project)?


Here’s the way HMRC frame those questions… this is an email from an HMRC R&D tax relief officer…
1 What is the scientific or technological advance?
Rather than stating the name of the product, process, functionality, etc, being developed you should consider what scientific or technological advance is being sought. This focuses attention on the project’s aim for an advance, which is the key issue in judging whether R&D for tax purposes is being undertaken.
Science does not include work in the arts, humanities and social sciences (including economics).
It’s not enough that a product is commercially innovative. You can’t claim in respect of projects to develop innovative business products or services that don’t incorporate any advance in science or technology.
2 What were the scientific or technological uncertainties involved in the project?
Scientific or technological uncertainty exists when knowledge of whether something is scientifically possible or technologically feasible, or how to achieve it in practice, is not readily available or deducible by a competent professional working in the field.
But uncertainties that can be resolved through relatively brief discussions with peers are routine uncertainties rather than technological uncertainties. Technical problems that have been overcome in previous projects on similar systems are not likely to be technological uncertainties.
You should set out at a high level, in a form understandable to the non-expert, what these uncertainties were and when they started and ended.
3 How and when were the uncertainties actually overcome?
Describe the methods adopted to overcome the uncertainties and the investigations and analysis undertaken. This should not be in great detail, simply sufficient to show that the matter was not straightforward. Describe the successes and failures and the impact of these on the overall project. If the uncertainties were not overcome, explain what happened.
4 Why was the knowledge being sought not readily deducible by a competent professional?
It might be publicly known that others have attempted to resolve the uncertainties and failed, or perhaps that others have resolved the uncertainties but that precisely how it was done is not in the public domain. In either case a valid technological uncertainty can still exist.
Alternatively, if the project is one where there is little public information available, you’ll need to show that the persons leading the R&D project are themselves competent professionals working in the relevant field. This might be done by outlining their relevant background, professional qualifications and recent experience. Then have them explain why they consider the uncertainties are scientific or technological uncertainties rather than routine uncertainties.
Whichever is appropriate set out the details and have evidence available if needed.